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Article 2 (Aug 2018): September is National Emergency Preparedness Month

August 30, 2018
Federal Emergency Management (FEMA) recommendations     
 
When you consider what supplies you would need for three days after a natural disaster, first consider what emergencies are most likely to occur in your area. Prepare accordingly.
              
A supply kit sounds like something you could carry, but it isn't. When you consider a three-day supply of water and food per person (and pet), plus clothes, shoes, a sleeping bag or blanket for each one, plastic sheeting and duct tape, it's hardly moveable. You need space and a convenient location.
              
If the emergency could be a flood, the attic or second floor might be a good storage area. If you are more likely to be trapped by a blizzard, tornado, or earthquake, a part of the garage or basement would be better.
              
That's especially true since the government recommends including garbage bags and closers, toilet paper, hand tools, a bottle of bleach, moist towelettes, a first aid kit, disposable plates, cups and dinnerware, and a fire extinguisher.
              
Create an ID Kit of insurance policies, identification, and bank account records in a separate waterproof container.

Some emergency items don't take as much room. They include:
 
  • A flashlight, battery-operated radio and cell phone with extra batteries, and matches in a waterproof container.
  • A three-day supply of medications, plus traveler's checks, cash and change, pencil and paper, and a dust mask.
  • Personal hygiene items and feminine supplies should be included.
  • If you have a baby, don't forget the disposable diapers. If you have children, include books, games and puzzles.
Getting ready for an emergency or disaster sounds like a lot of work, but if one occurs, you'll be glad you put your time and money into the project.
              
If trapped on the road during a tornado, never leave your car to shelter under a bridge. There are no handholds and the wind action under a bridge can brutally injure and maim.
              
By the way, if a forest fire heads your way, all you'll need is a little cash, the ID container, your medicine and some gas in your car.  Get going.
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